LifestyleAre Conservative UK councils placing more children in care than Labour councils...

Are Conservative UK councils placing more children in care than Labour councils each year? An in-depth analysis

child care

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Child Welfare in England: The Impact of Political Leadership on Children in Care

The number of children in care in England has seen a significant rise, with over 80,000 children currently in care, marking a nearly one-third increase since 2010. Recent research has revealed an interesting correlation between local party politics and the number of children being taken into care. A study conducted between 2015 and 2021 found that on average, Conservative-led councils took in six to seven more children per year compared to Labour-led councils.

Regional Disparities in Child Welfare

There have been notable disparities in the rise of children in care across different local authorities since the coalition government took office in 2010. While the north-east of England has experienced an increase of over 60%, inner London has seen a decrease of almost 20% in the number of children in care.

Economic Factors and Child Welfare

Past studies have indicated that economic circumstances play a crucial role in determining the likelihood of a child being taken into care. Children in the most deprived neighborhoods are over ten times more likely to be in care compared to those in the least deprived areas. Despite efforts to address child poverty and “level up” opportunities, child poverty rates have escalated at a faster rate in Labour councils than in Conservative ones.

Research Findings and Analysis

Our research delved into the correlation between child welfare trends and local political leadership across English local authorities. By creating a statistical model, we predicted the expected trends in children in care if economic factors had remained constant from 2015 to 2021. The results revealed a stark difference in the number of children taken into care between Conservative and Labour councils, even when accounting for poverty levels.

Child poverty emerged as the primary factor influencing the rise in children in care, with local increases in poverty levels directly correlating with a higher number of children entering care. This trend is largely shaped by national policies impacting employment, wages, and housing costs, over which local councils have limited control.

An in-depth analysis of care numbers showed an average increase of seven to eight children in care per year in a typical local authority between 2015 and 2021. This underscores the pressing need for a comprehensive approach to address the growing challenges faced by vulnerable children in England.

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