NewsEric Adams Continues the Legacy of One-Term NYC Mayors

Eric Adams Continues the Legacy of One-Term NYC Mayors

In the last 50 years, New York has had just two mayors booted from office after a single term. Abe Beame and David Dinkins were loyal Democrats who spent years climbing the party ladder before getting to the top. But the City Hall hot seat proved to be too hot, and voters turned them out after each had served four turbulent years. The troubles they encountered were distinct to their personalities and tenures, but the men shared a common malady. Both appeared to be overmatched by the enormous demands of the job. Although history has largely defined their failures around single key issues — the 1975 fiscal crisis in Beame’s case and the early ’90s violent crime epidemic in Dinkins’ — the overriding impression was that the job was too big for them and that the city was spinning out of control. Which brings us to Eric Adams. Midway through his term, Gotham’s 110th mayor has hit the wall. He is swamped with problems and seems to have few allies and fewer ideas about how to get a handle on the mushrooming crises. His administration always appears to be behind the curve, with the recent surge of pro-Hamas rallies shutting down roads and public spaces before police can react. Underwater approval Law-abiding citizens get punished by ineffectiveness, leading to questions about whether the city is governable. In fact, it is governable, as Ed Koch, Rudy Giuliani and Mike Bloomberg resoundingly proved at different times. But ask the question today and many New Yorkers would say no, it’s not governable. What they really mean is that it’s not governable the way Adams is trying to do it. A December poll underscored the point. Adams’ approval rating was at a disastrous 28%, the lowest Quinnipiac University has recorded in its 27 years of surveying New Yorkers about their chief executives. Echoes of Beame and Dinkins ring loudly in that the doubts about Adams range across the board. On his handling of crime, schools, the surge of migrants, homelessness and the budget, his approval numbers averaged 27%, while the disapprovals averaged 63%. There are also major concerns about what Quinnipiac calls his “personal traits.” Some 55% of those questioned said Adams does not have strong leadership qualities, 56% said he does not understand their problems and 54% said he is not honest or trustworthy. And the good news? There wasn’t much, with just 35% of Democrats approving of his mayoralty. Only black respondents gave a thumbs up, 48%-38%. The chance that even worse news is coming is heightened by reports that Adams has told associates he expects to be indicted, perhaps this month. The case being pursued by federal prosecutors centers on questions of whether he conspired with the Turkish government to make illegal contributions to his 2021 campaign. At least two fundraising aides were the subject of search warrants and, » … Read More

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Subscribe Today

GET EXCLUSIVE FULL ACCESS TO PREMIUM CONTENT

SUPPORT NONPROFIT JOURNALISM

EXPERT ANALYSIS OF AND EMERGING TRENDS IN CHILD WELFARE AND JUVENILE JUSTICE

TOPICAL VIDEO WEBINARS

Get unlimited access to our EXCLUSIVE Content and our archive of subscriber stories.

Exclusive content

Latest article

More article